Hitler's Struggle (part III: the unfinished war)



Russian poster from 1920
showing Lenin sweeping the globe clean
from both, Monarchs (the OWO) and Bankers (the NWO)

Most countries involved in WWI found themselves fighting two wars at the same time; one against foreign armies, and another against domestic strikes and uprisings; as we saw in South Africa with the Boer Revolt. WWI was highly unpopular, and when it began the public –and even the armies- didn't know why or against whom they were fighting, nor did they feel the conflict had anything to do with them. All sides were aware of this popular discontent, and saw the advantage of harnessing it among the enemy’s population. Britain saw many protest and strikes –mainly from worker unions-; as well as France, which also experienced some mutinies among its troops. [1] But it would be Russia and Germany who would suffer the worst consequences.

It was during WWI that the 1917 Communist Revolution took place (which we already saw in a previous chapter); but we didn’t see that Germany also played a key role in it. As well as the international bankers, Germany also funded the Bolsheviks. [1] It’s obvious that the Kaiser had no sympathy for communists, but he saw the advantage of helping them destabilise Russia and with it take it out of WWI. This was the same strategy used by the international bankers; who also funded the communists, but in their case, to take the Tsar out of their way to Russia's rich natural resources; which would be actually their second attempt, as Jacob Schiff had already tried it by funding Japan's war effort against Russia, sending them three large loans between 1904 and 1905. [2] But apart from the funding that the Bolsheviks received from both, the apologists for the NWO and the apologists for the OWO, the German government also helped Lenin get back into Russia from Switzerland -along with other Russian exiles- by arranging safe passage for him by train via Frankfurt, Berlin and Stockholm. [3] Lenin’s arrival in Petrograd would mark the beginning of the end for the Tsar; and with it, Russia’s withdrawal from WWI, the creation of the USSR, and the birth of a new enemy to both, the Old World Order and the New World Order (as we will see in a future chapter).

But the Kaiser was about to endure a similar blow as the one he plotted against his cussing the Tsar. By September 1918 a mutiny broke out among the sailors of the German High Seas Fleet, known as the Wilhelmshaven mutiny. This event triggered the German Revolution of 1918, the abdication of the Kaiser, the establishment of the Weimar Republic, and ultimately led to the surrender of Germany, and therefore, the end of WWI. [4]

At the time when the mutiny broke out, a young Adolf Hitler was in hospital recovering for the second time from this war injuries; this is how he remembered the event:

“In November the general tension increased. And then one day, suddenly and unexpectedly, the calamity descended. Sailors arrived in trucks and proclaimed the revolution; a few Jewish youths were the 'leaders' in this struggle for the 'freedom, beauty, and dignity' of our national existence. None of them had been at the front.” [5]
From that moment on, Hitler –as well as many other Germans- was convinced that the enemy did not only lay beyond German borders, but also within; and according to him, all the evidences pointed to one single suspect:

“The real organizer of the Revolution and the actual wire-puller behind it, the international Jew”. [5]
Since WWI most countries realised that the enemy within was as dangerous as any foreign standing army, and none of the great powers would ever risk again this type of interference. During the next world war most countries would take measures to prevent any domestic uprisings, for example: the Nazis sent all the Jews and left-wingers to concentration camps; the United States did the same with American-Japanese citizens; and Britain also locked in prisons, for the whole duration of the war and without trial or charges under Regulation 18B, any citizens suspected of sympathising with Germany. [6]


… Next Chapter: Hitler’s Struggle (part IV: the eternal Jew)


References:
[1] Hew Strachan, “The First World War, Volume I: To Arms”, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2001; cited in: “The First World War”, Hamilton Film Partnership, 2003
[2] Joseph Jacob et al, “The Jewish Encyclopedia: Jacob Henry Schiff”, The Jewish Encyclopedia, 1901-1906; cited in: “The Jewish Encyclopedia”, JewishEncyclopedia.com, 2002
[3] Wikipedia: Vladimir Lenin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_Lenin)
[4] Wikipedia: Wilhelmshaven mutiny (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilhelmshaven_mutiny)
[5] Adolf Hitler, "Mein Kampf", Eher Verlag, Munich, 1925
[6] Archibald Maule Ramsay, "The Nameless War", Britons Publishing Company, London, 1952

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